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Schedule

Page history last edited by Sue Muecke 9 years, 8 months ago

Course Schedule

 

 

Below is our tentative schedule for the semester.  Be advised that this schedule is subject to change over the course of the term.  Click on hyperlinked dates to go to the specific page for that class session.  When you see "Reading" and/or "Writing" for a given day, that means that you must have the assigned reading and/or writing done BEFORE that class session.  Make sure to check out upcoming dates to see what assignments will be due soon.

 

Week One

September 1:

Introductions

Syllabus review

Wiki orientation

Writing sample

 

September 3:

Overview of writing samples

The writing process

Reading: "Shitty First Drafts" by Anne Lamott

              The Scott, Foresman Writer, pages 13-45 (available under Content on our course

Blackboard page)

Writing: Complete your Roster page before class time today.
 

 

Week Two 

September 6: 

No Class - Labor Day

 

September 8:

Introduction to rhetoric

Reading: Everything's an Argument Chapter 1 ("Everything Is an Argument")

Writing: Write a 250+ word defense of a public figure who has fallen from grace (such as former Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick or Tiger Woods).  Responses need to be posted on the Defending Their Lives page by 5:00pm on Tuesday, September 7.  See that page for more information.

 

September 10:

Introduction to rhetorical analysis

Reading: Everything's an Argument Chapter 5 ("Rhetorical Analysis")

             "They Say/I Say" Chapter 12 ("'What's Motivating This Writer?': Reading for the

Conversation") 

 

 

Week Three

September 13:

Introduction to Project One

Analyzing visual rhetoric

Reading: "Drugs" by Gore Vidal

                 "Don't Legalize Drugs" by Theodore Dalrymple

              Instructions and student examples for Project One

Writing: Write a 250+ word response comparing and contrasting the rhetorical techniques of the above articles.  Responses need to be posted on the Take Two and Call Me in the Morning page.  See that page for more information.

 

September 15:

Rhetorical analysis of a graphic novel

Reading: The entirety of Maus I: My Father Bleeds History

 

September 17:

Building a rhetorical analysis essay

Reading: The entirety of Maus II: And Here My Troubles Began

Writing: Write a 250+ word response to Maus.  Responses need to be posted on the A Game of Cat and Maus page by 5:00pm on Thursday, September 16.  See that page for more information.

             Post your chosen work for Project One as a comment on the Mine, Mine, Mine! page.
 

 

Week Four

September 20:

Rhetorical analysis across different media

Reading: "This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen" by Tadeusz Borowski

Writing:  Write a 250+ word response to "This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen."  You should consider this text in relation to Maus.  Responses need to be posted on the Work Will Set You Free page by 5:00pm on Sunday, September 19.  See that page for more information.

 

September 22:

Project One pitfalls

How to upload documents to the wiki

Plagiarism

SafeAssign

Reading: Everything's an Argument Chapter 18 ("Intellectual Property, Academic Integrity, and

Avoiding Plagiarism")

      The Scott, Foresman Writer, pages 233-242 (available under Content on our course

Blackboard page)
 

September 24:

Outline workshop

Writing: Bring 5 hard copies of your complete Project One outline to class today.  Four copies will be used in small group outline workshops, and one will be handed in to me. 

 

 

Week Five

September 27:

Project One rough draft workshop

Writing: Submit your Project One rough draft by uploading the document to the wiki, then linking it on your Roster page.

 

September 29:

Revision workshop

Editing vs. revising

Writing: Bring one hard copy of your Project One rough draft to class.

 

October 1:

Project One rough draft workshop #2

Writing: Submit your revised rough draft of Project One by uploading it to the wiki, then posting a separate link to the revised document on your Roster page.
 

 

Week Six

October 4:

Introduction to Project Two

Definition arguments

Reading: Everything's an Argument Chapter 9 ("Arguments of Definition")

              Instructions and student examples for Project Two

Don't Forget: Final draft of Project One due by 11:59pm - submit your final draft by uploading the document to the wiki, then linking it to your name on the U Can Haz Rhetorical Analysez page.

 

October 6:

In-class definition and audience exercises

Don't Forget: SafeAssign reports due for Project One - report print-outs must be handed in to me at the beginning of class.

 

October 8:

Research and MLA Day!

Reading: Everything's an Argument Chapter 16 ("What Counts as Evidence")

              The Scott, Foresman Writer Chapter 23 ("Evaluating Sources") - available under

Content on our course Blackboard page

              Familiarize yourself with Everything's an Argument Chapter 20 ("Documenting

Sources"), pages 566-585 

 

 

Week Seven

October 11:

Project Two Planning Workshop

Writing: Post your answers to the Project Two Planning Questions as a comment on the Inconceivable! page by 5:00pm on Sunday, October 10.

Reading: Re-visit the Inconceivable! page after 5:00pm on Sunday, October 10 and read your classmates' responses to these questions.  Choose at least one project (not your own) that you're interested in discussing in class.

 

October 13:

Incorporating research into research papers

Quotation sandwiches

Reading: "They Say/I Say" Chapter 1 ("They Say: Starting with What Others are Saying")

              "They Say/I Say" Chapter 3 ("As He Himself Puts It: The Art of Quoting")

              "They Say/I Say" Chapter 4 ("Yes/No/Okay, But: Three Ways to Respond")

 

October 15:

In-class research exercise

 

 

Week Eight

October 18:

Project Two rough draft workshop

Writing: Submit your Project Two rough draft by uploading the document to the wiki, then linking it on your Roster page. 
 

October 20:

Debates

Reading: "Calvin Klein: A Case Study"

              "Nude Pics Raised Red Flags"

              "Teens Threatened With 'Sexting' Porn Charge Sue Prosecutor"

              "Supreme Court Strikes Down Ban on Virtual Child Porn"

 

October 22:

No Class - Instructor at Conference

 

 

Week Nine 

October 25:

No Class - Instructor at Conference

Mid-term evaluations

 

October 27:

Review of debates

Evaluation arguments

In-class evaluation exercises

Reading: Everything's an Argument Chapter 10 ("Evaluations")

 

October 29:

Proposal arguments

In-class proposal exercises

Introduction to Project Three

Reading: Everything's an Argument Chapter 12 ("Proposals")

              Instructions and student examples for Project Three

Don't Forget: Final draft of Project Two due by 11:59pm - submit your final draft by uploading the document to the wiki, then linking it to your name on the Finished page.  Please also email me your SafeAssign reports, either by copying and pasting the report into an email or by sending me a link to the report.

 

 

Week Ten 

November 1:

In-class problem-solving exercise

Don't Forget: If you haven't already emailed me your SafeAssign report for Project Two, please bring your report print-out to class.

 

November 3:

Project Three Planning Workshop

Writing: Post your answers to the Project Three Planning Questions as a comment on the It Needs Evaluation page by 5:00pm on November 2.

Reading: Re-visit the It Needs Evaluation page after 5:00pm on Tuesday, November 2 and read your classmates' responses to these questions.  Choose at least one project (not your own) that you're interested in discussing in class.

 

November 5:

Addressing potential objections to your argument

Reading: "They Say/I Say" Chapter 6 ("Skeptics May Object: Planting a Naysayer in Your Text")

 

 

Week Eleven 

November 8:

Project Three rough draft workshop

Writing: Submit your Project Three rough draft by uploading the document to the wiki, then linking it on your Roster page.

 

November 10:

Perfecting your essay from beginning to end - titles and conclusions

Reading: "They Say/I Say" Chapter 7 ("So What?  Who Cares?: Saying Why It Matters")

 

November 12:

Debates

 

 

Week Twelve 

November 15:

Introduction to Project Four and presentations

Reading: Instructions and student examples for Project Four

              Everything's an Argument Chapter 15 ("Presenting Arguments")

 

November 17:

How soccer explains the cultural analysis

Reading: Chapter 9 of Franklin Foer's How Soccer Explains the World (available under Content on our course Blackboard page)

 

November 19:

Cultural analysis media edition: TV and movies and video games, oh my!

Reading: Excerpts from Steven Johnson's Everything Bad is Good For You (available under Content on our course Blackboard page)
Don't Forget: Final draft of Project Three due by 11:59pm - submit your final draft by uploading the document to the wiki, then linking it to your name on the It's the Final Countdown page.  Please also email me your SafeAssign reports, either by copying and pasting the report into an email or by sending me a link to the report.

 

 

Week Thirteen 

November 22:

Project Four outline workshop

Writing: Bring 5 hard copies of your Project Four outline to class.

Don't Forget: SafeAssign reports due for Project Three - report print-outs must be handed in to me at the beginning of class.

 

November 24 & November 26: 

No Class - Happy Thanksgiving!

 

 

Week Fourteen 

November 29:

Project Four rough draft workshop

Writing: Submit your Project Four rough draft by uploading the document to the wiki, then linking it on your Roster page.

 

December 1:

Presentations

  • Melinda
  • Tim
  • Nicolette
  • Adrianna
  • Ricardo 

 

December 3:

Presentations

  • Hannah
  • George
  • Abby
  • Jim
  • Nick 

 

 

Week Fifteen 

December 6:

Presentations

  • Alex
  • Ciara
  • Brad
  • Fahad
  • Kendra 

 

December 8:

Presentations

  • Drew
  • Sean
  • Dennis
  • Ashley
  • Keiona 

 

December 10:

Presentations

  • Brianne
  • Sara
  • Megan
  • Frederick 

 

 

Week Sixteen 

December 13:

Course evaluations

Tearful goodbyes

 

December 17:

Writing: Final draft of Project Four due by 11:59pm - submit your final draft by uploading the document to the wiki, then linking it to your name on the Goodbye page.

Email: SafeAssign reports for Project Four also due by 11:59pm.  You can either email me the URL to the report itself (there is a button on the report page that allows you to do this) or else copy and paste the text of the report into a Word document and email that.

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