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September Twenty-Fourth

Page history last edited by Sue Muecke 10 years, 3 months ago

Project One Outline Workshop

 

 


 

How to Upload Papers to the Wiki

 


 

And Now for a Taste of Things to Come...

 

 

First, take a moment to answer the following questions:

  1. Do you have questions about a specific part(s) of your outline?
  2. What are your concerns as you prepare to write a Project One rough draft? 

 

 

Then, in your group, evaluate each outline one at a time by answering the following questions:

 

1.  First, make sure to address any questions or concerns the writer has about his/her own outline based on his/her responses to the above questions.

 

2.  Evaluate the thesis statement.  Does it clearly identify the argument of the work being analyzed and mention the techniques used to make that argument?  Does your classmate put forth a clear argument about the rhetoric in the work?

 

3.  Is the paper set up to be a rhetorical analysis rather than a summary or a review?

 

4.  Does the outline indicate where the paper will give the necessary summary and background of the work being analyzed?  If not, where could the writer incorporate this information?

 

5.  Does the outline indicate how the paper will carry out the argument set forth in the thesis?  In other words, if the thesis takes the format "In W, A uses X, Y, and Z to prove T," is it clear where the writer will discuss X, Y, and Z in the paper?

 

6.  Does the outline include specific details from the work that illustrate the points the writer is making about the work's rhetoric?  If not, ask the writer for such examples and help him/her figure out how they fit into the outline.

 

7.  Evaluate the structure and organization of the argument - do points follow logically from each other?  Will the structure of the paper allow the writer to prove the argument he/she is making about the rhetoric?  Give suggestions for strengthening the paper's organization.

 

8.  What hasn't the writer considered yet?  What could be added to make the essay stronger?  What points look like they could use more support or explanation?  Conversely, is there anything that is not needed?  Points or examples that do not seem relevant to the main argument?

 


 

Assignment for Monday:

 

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