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November Twelfth

Page history last edited by Sue Muecke 9 years, 9 months ago

 


 


 

Welcome to our final round of debates!  Today, we will focus on proposal arguments - we'll be debating whether we should or should not do something.  In order to make these arguments, we will need to evaluate the problem/situation these proposals seek to address.  We will thus be utilizing both the evaluation and proposal skills necessary for Project Three.

 

Today's debates will follow the same structure as our previous ones: 

  • 10 minutes - Planning Session
  • 20 minutes - Debate #1
  • 20 minutes - Debate #2

 

 

The Planning Session:

Since you already know the case / position you're arguing, now is the time to take your individual research efforts and synthesize a team strategy.  Key elements you might want to consider / develop:

  • What does your team consider to be the problem / solution here?
    • In other words, is the current state of affairs problematic?
    • Or does the current situation solve a previous problem?
  • Discuss what research, examples, explanations, etc. you'll want to use to support your argument or to refute the opposition's argument.
  • What thoughts do you want to leave the jury with?  Consider our discussion of "who cares?" and "so what?" here.

 

 

The Debate Format:

  • Team A's opening statement: 1 minute
  • Team B's opening statement: 1 minute

 

  • Team A's main argument: 3 minutes
  • Recess for Team B to prepare a rebuttal: 1 minute
  • Team B's rebuttal of A's argument: 1 minute

 

  • Team B's main argument: 3 minutes
  • Recess for Team A to prepare a rebuttal: 1 minute
  • Team A's rebuttal of B's argument: 1 minute

 

  • Team A's closing statement: 1 minute
  • Team B's closing statement: 1 minute

 

  • Jury questions and open discussion: approximately 5 minutes

 


 

You Want the Truth?  You Can't Handle the Truth!

 

Like our last debate session, the jury has the most important role here - you need to analyze, judge, and determine a winner between the two teams.  During the debate, you should be writing down particularly key points the teams made, particularly egregious rhetorical fallacies, and any questions you may want to ask during the free-for-all.

 

Following the class, email me your verdict (s.muecke@wayne.edu).  Verdicts should be approximately 250 words in length and should include evaluations and observations of the debate for which you were a jury member.  Tell me the good things and bad things that each team did.  Then tell me which team you think won the debate and why.

 

NOTE: Your vote for the winning team should NOT be based on which side's argument you personally agree with.  Rather, it should be based on which team made the more convincing argument and gave compelling examples to back up its evaluation / proposal. 

 

On Monday, I will reveal the winning teams and give a quick overview of each team's strengths and weaknesses.

 


 

Debate #1: English 1020 Should/Should Not Have an Attendance Policy

 

WSU's English Department mandates that English 1020 have an attendance policy.  Under this attendance policy, 1020 students are permitted a certain number of unexcused absences.  If they miss more than that number of unexcused absences, their grades are penalized.  Should attendance be mandatory in college classes?

 

Team A: Affirmative

Team A will argue that English 1020 should have an attendance policy.

Melinda

Megan

Kendra

Nicolette

Sara

Ashley

 

Team B: Negative

Team B will argue that English 1020 should not have an attendance policy.

Jim

Dennis

Brad

Nick

Ricardo

Sean

Tim

 


 

Debate #2: English 1020 Should/Should Not Be a Required Class for Graduation

 

Like many colleges and universities, WSU requires students to complete (and pass) a basic composition course such as ENG 1020 in order to graduate. Should composition classes such as 1020 be mandatory for all students?

 

Team A: Affirmative
Team A will argue that composition classes such as 1020 should be required for all college students.

Fahad

Ciara

Adrianna

Alex

Keiona

Abby

 

Team B: Negative
Team B will argue that composition classes such as 1020 should not be required for all college students.

Brianne

Andrew

Frederick

George

Mohamad

Hannah

 


 

Assignment for Monday:

  • Email me (s.muecke@wayne.edu) your jury verdict by 5:00pm on Sunday, November 14.
  • Read Everything's an Argument Chapter 15 ("Presenting Arguments")
  • Read the instructions and student examples for Project Four 

 

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